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  • Canarina
    • canariensis   CAG01713

      (Canary Island bellflower)
      Height4m
      Width4m
      Flowering SeasonWi - Sp
      WaterL
      LightLight Shade
      Canarina canariensis
      for $7.00earn 100 points

      A winter growing climber from the Canary Islands and one of the few members of the Campanula family with flowers of a colour other than blue, purple, white or pink.

      Succulent stems scramble over any nearby support clothing themselves as they grow with rubbery, toothed, triangular leaves. From mid winter until the summer heat, pendant , bell shaped, orange flowers, intricately veined in red, glow amongst the foliage. Improbably real, rather seeming to be molded from translucent orange rubber and stuck on by a garden prankster.
      With the onset of summer it quietly retreats underground to it's large tuberous roots to await the cooler moister weather needed to support such a riot of opulent growth, making it ideally suited to Perth's Mediterranean climate.

      A lightly shaded site with well drained soil and little if any summer water is ideal. Against the south side of a house or other building is often to it's liking making it one of the few plants to thrive in such a situation.

      So unlike any other plant. Plant porn as it's finest.

  • Chasmanthe
    • floribunda   CAG02923
      Height1.5m
      Width60cm
      Flowering SeasonSpring
      WaterL
      LightSun
      for $7.00earn 35 points

      Like a Watsonia on roids.
      Bold lush clumps of bright green, sword-like leaves support slightly wayward, planar spikes of tubular, burnt orange, bird pollinated flowers on slender dark stems, perfect for the vase or the drought loving tropical style garden. Cormous and summer deciduous. From south western Africa.

      Not weedy as are some of the Watsonia, with which it is often confused, though it does self sow and seems to be more fond of drier conditions.
      Easily grown in any well drained sunny soil, during its summer dormancy irrigation is unnecessary and may even be of detriment (I've never tried watering it).

  • Cyrtanthus
    • brachyscyphus   CAG00880

      (Dobo lily)
      Height30cm
      Width30cm
      Flowering SeasonSpring
      WaterM
      LightLight Shade
      Cyrtanthus brachyscyphus
      for $7.00earn 35 points

      Clusters of tubular, coral coloured flowers serenely nod on smooth stems over loose clumps of arching, strappy leaves from semi exposed fleshy bulbs. One of the finest pot specimens, without need of frequent repotting, or scatter clumps through low ground cover, Viola hederacea or Glechoma hederacea would fit the bill, in sheltered sites for uncluttered elegance yet spring panache.

      From the eastern Cape of South Africa and easily grown in any none too heavy soil with regular summer water, though a dry period won't kill it, where it may even gently self sow. Mostly evergreen in Perth but likely to be winter deciduous in areas much colder.

  • Dicliptera
    • sericea   CAG03140
      Height30cm
      Width2m
      Flowering SeasonSu - Au
      WaterM - L
      LightSun
      for $7.00earn 35 points

      A tropicalesque groundcover from central Brazil and Uruguay, well known for its dependability, made entirely of soft grey-green velvet the ovate leaves clothe rapidly sprawling stems and bear clusters of tubular orange flowers throughout the warmer months. Very nice encroaching upon paths or stonework or as anchorage around large Gums, an Agave americana or its ilk could round out the ensemble.

      Easily grown in any reasonably well drained sunny soil and nigh on unkillable, though being from a summer rainfall climate it rewards a little irrigation. Frost tender but often seen benefiting from the umbrella of a tree even in the chilliest inland gardens.

      If it ever looks scraggly an aggressive cut down to near ground level will see it return to plushness in short order.

  • Dimorphotheca
    • sinuata   CAG02862

      (African daisy)
      Height30cm
      Width20cm
      Flowering SeasonSpring
      WaterL
      LightFull Sun
      for $3.00earn 15 points
      SEEDS

      An easy to grow, very showy, winter annual from our geographically disparate climate cousin Namaqualand. Dark eyed, soft orange to apricot daisy flowers are copiously produced above leafy clumps of light silvery green, narrowly lobed leaves.

      Well adapted to poor sandy soil but happy in anything that is not too wet. In autumn or early winter scratch in or lightly cover seeds where they are to grow in as sunny position as possible and where they will hopefully reseed for coming years. Add an Ostrich or an Oryx or two for extra realism.

      Each pack contains 50+ seeds.

  • Eschscholzia
    • californica   CAG00241

      (Calfornian poppy)
      Height30cm
      Width40cm
      Flowering SeasonSp - Su
      WaterL
      LightFull Sun
      for $3.00earn 15 points
      SEEDS

      The satiny, orange, 10cm, poppy flowers of this short lived perennial from western North America are borne in great abundance through spring and early summer over mounds of lacy, fern-like, glaucous leaves. One of the most popular annuals of all time, in our better suited climate it is more reliably perennial.

      Drought hardy and self seeding it can be naturalised in any well drained, exposed and sunny position.

      Shade and/or summer water will led to premature demise.

      Scratch seeds into bare soil where they are to grow in autumn or winter.

      Each pack contains 50+ seeds at the very least.

  • Habranthus
    • tubispathus ‘Cupreus’   CAG02137
      Height20cm
      Width5cm
      Flowering SeasonAll
      WaterM
      LightSun - L. Sh.
      Habranthus tubispathus ‘Cupreus’
      for $7.00earn 35 points

      A diminutive, albeit charming, bulb whose coppery goblets pop up randomly through the year, with or without their accompanying grassy leaves, most often just a few days after rain.

      Exceedingly easy to grow it has adapted to be predominantly winter growing here though in habitat around the Gulf of Mexico as well Argentina and Uruguay I would expect it to grow more in summer to coincide with rainfall. It should perform well, at least in a pot, from Albany to Townsville.

      Tolerant, maybe even fond, of short periods of drought and flood though freezing is likely bad. An excellent pot subject small and demure enough to be a companion to larger potted celebrities.

      Slow to vegatively increase but self sowing in good conditions and then after a few years can make quite a spectacle in mass flower.

  • Hemerocallis

    (Daylilies)
    Xanthorrhoeaceae

    One of the worlds most popular garden plants, especially in the U.S. They are care free clump forming perennials with large beautiful flowers in a wide range of colours held over neat grass-like foliage. They are sensationally tough and are happy in just about any soil and climate found in Australia. They are also completely edible and in their native China are commonly consumed.

    We originally started growing and selling Daylilies in the eighties at one point having thousands of varieties and tens of thousands of plants in full production. They have large fleshy roots and are poorly suited to pot culture and so are traditionally sold bare rooted and establish very easily. While there was interest from the landscaping trade, some mass plantings can still be seen around Perth decades later, most gardeners in W.A. are conditioned to buying flowering plants in pots.

    We no longer maintain vast quantities nor keep up with the latest breeding developments, new varieties cost many hundreds of dollars. Instead we focus on choice varieties of outstanding garden merit. Many of these varieties are "old" and no longer popular and have almost ceased to exist. As with many plants modern breeding offers a fantastic array of flower colours and forms but there seems to be little regard to grace, habit and overall garden worthiness and most lack the elegance and charm of old favourites, tried and true.

    Daylilies do survive drought very well but will perform very poorly under such conditions and in our climate are perhaps not the most suitable plant for mass plantings but a large clump or two is easy enough to throw an occasional bucket of water on and will enrich any garden.
    • fulva ‘Kwanso’   CAG03169
      Height50cm
      Width60cm
      Flowering SeasonSp - Su
      WaterM
      LightSun - L. Sh.
      for $7.00earn 35 points

      A vulgar nightmare of the genteel gardener, orange, weedy and common (at least it was in the time before paving became the dominant feature of gardens). However in this more progressive century I feel I no longer have to keep such a useful and beautiful plant hidden from fear of being tarred and feathered by the horticultural elite.

      Unusual compared to modern Daylilies in that it runs (spreads by stolons) forming a lush weed suppressing carpet after a few years, that is self healing shrugging off abuse by dogs and plumbers alike, ideal for filling public spaces. The soft marmalade flowers are more shapely too (modern doubles mostly resemble a mutant cabbage) with their many layers of reflexed pointed petals, each bearing a dark chevron, and are held on fine stems, showy but still refined enough to blend with natural plantings and combining particularly well with grasses.

      A simple and scalable ensemble could consist of nothing more than a sea of H. ‘Kwanso’ broken by outcrops of Miscanthus, either of a single variety or a select few for more flavour. A natural plant association from eastern Asia easily maintained by the most uneducated of power tool wielders.

      Very easily grown in any soil with moisture available till at least peak flowering has finished. While Daylilies survive drought it does adversely affect their performance (read as: they won't die but neither will they look good).

      While I'm touting it's weediness I can't say I've ever found it to be aggressive, certainly much less than popular lawn grasses, maybe I just don't water enough.

    • ‘Mambo Maid’   CAG00365
      Height30cm
      Width25cm
      Flowering SeasonSp - Su
      WaterM
      LightSun
      Hemerocallis ‘Mambo Maid’
      for $7.00earn 35 points

      Cheeky smaller blooms of warm marmalade on slender 45cm stems over a neat clump of short, narrow, fresh green foliage.

      Well proportioned and very floriferous, perfect for tucking in to compositions in need of a little pizzazz where larger daylilies just won't do. Particular outstanding paired with blue foliage, Schizachyrium scoparium, Agave potatorum and Euphorbia characias work well.

      Evergreen. Diploid.

  • Oxalis
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