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  • Kniphofia

    (Red hot poker, Torch Lily)
    Xanthorrhoeaceae

    Stunning plants with flower heads almost always of strong vertical form and in uncommon colourings. A staple of the garden design palette they are versatile and dependable in well drained soil, either in mass plantings, perhaps in an array of colours, and exceptional when combined with other flowers of simple form eg. Achillea, Echinops. At their best when sited so later season performers obscure their grass-like foliage which can become untidy after flowering and tending to burn in too dry heat.

    Though wild plants are predominantly from seasonally moist habitats in the summer rainfall regions of southern Africa they do survive periods of dryness well thanks to a fleshy root system but they will, with some exception, require a degree of summer moisture to perform and flower in our climate.
    • ‘Orange Queen’   CAG00873
      Height1m
      Width40cm
      Flowering SeasonSp - Su
      WaterM - H
      LightSun
      Kniphofia ‘Orange Queen’
      for $7.00earn 35 points

      A tall variety with large vertical heads of rich orange flowers on sturdy stems from erect clumps of slightly glaucous, dark green, keeled, succulent and grass-like leaves.

      A reliable flowerer and among the latest to bloom with neater, darker foliage than many.

      For any reasonably well drained summer moist soil.

  • Watsonia
    • aletroides   CAG01174

      (Shrimp plant)
      Height1.2m
      Width30cm
      Flowering SeasonSpring
      WaterL
      LightSun
      Watsonia aletroides
      for $7.00earn 100 points

      Tubular, pale mouthed, coral flowers are artfully staggered to one side of slender vertical stems above a dense clump of red edged, sword-like leaves. A South African bulb (corm) that is summer deciduous and therefore eminently drought hardy, in fact a dry rest is essential.

      Stunning thrusting from between the simple mounds of cool coloured staples, Catmint, Lavender, and maybe a few of the Dutch Iris ‘Wedgwood’ that flowers simultaneously.

      Easily grown in any very sunny summer dry soil, heavy soils and wet feet in winter are tolerated and may even be preferred.

  • Artemisia
    • ludoviciana ‘Silver Queen’   CAG01724

      (Prairie sage, White sagebrush)
      Height1.5m
      Width60cm
      Flowering SeasonSu - Au
      WaterL
      LightSun - L. Sh.
      CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE

      A staple of gardens the world over though indigenous through most of North America. Suckering clumps of slender, upright, silver stems and narrow, incised leaves for pairing with other designer and mediterraneanesque plants. Cut down regularly to maintain verticality and boldest foliage or if left unchecked it will eventually form a dense mound of wiry, branching stems bearing irrelevant, small, pale yellow, button-like flowers, quite an effective silver shrub in wilder parts of the garden or fence line.

      Very vigorous and perfectly drought tolerant on well drained soils, struggling in heavy clay though more successful in lower rainfall regions. Impervious to any heat and cold experienced in this country but, as with most of the genus, unlikely to tolerate the summer humidity of more tropical zones. Dead easy and indestructible.

      Finer and more divided foliage than A. ‘Valerie Finnis’ and perhaps better for the vertical.

  • Kniphofia

    (Red hot poker, Torch Lily)
    Xanthorrhoeaceae

    Stunning plants with flower heads almost always of strong vertical form and in uncommon colourings. A staple of the garden design palette they are versatile and dependable in well drained soil, either in mass plantings, perhaps in an array of colours, and exceptional when combined with other flowers of simple form eg. Achillea, Echinops. At their best when sited so later season performers obscure their grass-like foliage which can become untidy after flowering and tending to burn in too dry heat.

    Though wild plants are predominantly from seasonally moist habitats in the summer rainfall regions of southern Africa they do survive periods of dryness well thanks to a fleshy root system but they will, with some exception, require a degree of summer moisture to perform and flower in our climate.
  • Veronicastrum
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